New Hall celebrates 15 years of soup lunches for CAFOD

New Hall school in Boreham has held a school wide Soup Lunch to help turn little fish into Big Fish, as part of CAFOD’s annual Lent fundraising campaign.

Instead of eating as normal, on Friday 3rd March the whole school had a simpler lunch.  Baguettes and a variety of soups – from leek and potato to tomato – were served as the only option.  As a result, 800 students enjoyed the soup alongside 400 staff.  New Hall has been doing soup lunches for the last 15 years at least, making the annual event a firm part of school tradition.

New Hall Students supporting CAFOD

New Hall  students celebrate their Lent fundraising achievement in the school chapel

The school’s fundraiser raised over £500 and their efforts will help provide communities across the world with the means to feed their families, by helping families to receive training to set up their own small businesses, like fish farms. This will enable them to turn one fish into a whole business and provide them with an income to support their families.

Katherine O’Brien, New Hall’s lay chaplain, said of the fundraiser:

“We do this as a way of standing in solidarity with those around the world who are in need.  The students have a high awareness of global issues but something like a soup lunch is a good way of making us all stop and think.  It’s a simple act but it can really make a difference, and it’s a great way of putting Lent into action.”

“Swimmingly well” the verdict after Brentwood school’s fishy fundraiser

St. Helen’s primary school in Brentwood has created a wonderful sea display to help turn little fish into Big Fish, as part of CAFOD’s annual Lent fundraising campaign.

Each student drew the outline of a large fish and covered it in coins to create the glistening effect of wet scales.  The fishy fundraiser raised over £300 and their efforts will help provide communities across the world with the means to feed their families, by helping families to receive training to set up their own small businesses, like fish farms. This will enable them to turn one fish into a whole business and provide them with an income to support their families.

St Helen's, Brentwood 2

Casting their nets

Miss McLoughlin, the R.E. co-ordinator, said:

“All of us wanted to ‘cast our nets’ and spread our generosity to help others.  We decided to ‘fish for change’ which we believe went ‘swimmingly well!’”

St Helen's, Brentwood

A school of fish at St Helen’s

Freddie, a pupil at St. Helen’s, said:

“I think this fundraising has been good because CAFOD are being helpful by teaching people how to fish and farm fish. It has been nice to look at a silvery fish on our wall and be reminded of people who are less fortunate than us”.

 

St Peter’s school creates a shimmering sea of blues and greens

St. Peter’s Primary School, Romford, has raised over £400 for CAFOD’s Lent fundraising campaign by encouraging pupils to dress up in sea themed colours and holding a coffee morning.

Inspired by the story of Florence, a Zambian widow who CAFOD supported by training her in fish farming, the whole school took part in the aquatic themed day.  Each child paid £1 and wore colours of the sea, whilst adults raised money through attending a spring coffee morning.

St Peter's Romford

St Peter’s pupils glistening in their blues and greens

Headteacher at St. Peter’s, Mrs Jenny Waterfield, said:

“The whole school looked like a ‘sea’ of fish, glistening and shimmering in their blues and greens.  I was very proud that the children recognised that giving money to CAFOD was part of our observance of almsgiving during this season of Lent.”

This Lent, CAFOD is working with communities in Zambia in Southern Africa. It is estimated that over half of Zambians live below the poverty line. This means that many families do not have enough money to meet basic needs such as food, housing and clothing.

CAFOD’s partners in Zambia provide training in fish farming, beekeeping and crop farming as well as helping individuals within communities develop business skills so those most in need understand how to get a better price for their goods, market them and even set up business partnerships.

By training individuals in the community, they will be able to share their new knowledge and empower the whole community. The money raised by St. Peter’s Primary School will mean that CAFOD’s partners will be able to continue to support projects around the world.